"First shot best shot" Kyudo Retreat May 25th to June 2, 2020

Dzogchen Kyudo Retreat: "First Shot Best Shot"

May 25th to June 2nd 2020

“When we draw down the power and depth of vastness into a single perception, then we are discovering and invoking magic.   By magic we do not mean unnatural power over the phenomenal world, but rather the discovery of innate or primordial wisdom in the world as it is.”

Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche

Dear Kyudoka,

I just wanted to send a note going over the idea of retreat practice and the view of the Kyudo retreat coming up at the end of this month.

The idea of retreat practice is to fully engage the view and technique of whatever form of practice the retreat is focused on.  At DMC we offer a variety of retreats throughout the year.  Each retreat focuses on a different practice within the mandala of Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche’s lineage.  I view Kyudo as a practice within this mandala.  Shibata Sensei was a master of kKudo who was invited by Trungpa Rinpoche to come to the USA to teach Kyudo to Trungpa’s students.  I was one of those students.  Beginning in 1987, I studied Kyudo with other students of Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche. 

Over the years the emphasis of Kyudo has changed and it is taught as a Japanese contemplative art outside of the teachings of Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche. That is not what I offer here at DMC. 

People who study Kyudo with me will also engage the teachings of Trungpa Rinpoche.  Kyudo is the technique, but the view of the practice is Dzogchen as expressed by Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche through his teachings.

Generally the retreats at DMC are ‘closed retreats.’  This means that participants enter the retreat at the beginning and stay for the entire time.  Retreats are meant to be completely immersive experiences.  We disconnect from our usual engagements and focus primarily on the training being offered.  During closed retreats participants are not allowed to leave the retreat boundaries for the duration of the retreat unless there is an emergency.  We avoid use of the internet and cellphones. 

  The retreat is residential so I would suggest that students try to come for at least a full day or two.  All meals are provided as well as accommodations.

The Schedule:

Wake up 6:30

7-8 Sitting meditation in the main shrine room

8-9 Breakfast in the community room

9-12 Kyudo Training

12-1:30 Lunch and break

1:30- 3 work period

3:30-5:30 Kyudo Training

6:00 -7:00 Dinner

7-8 Sitting meditation

8-10 campfire and informal time

10 Lights out

 

Tashi Armstrong

Kyuo Instructor DMC

 "With every shot see your true nature"    Awa Kenzo

“All together, these three principles—heaven, earth, and man—deal with how we can integrate our state of mind into a work of art. A fourth principle, though not exactly the same kind of principle, is that of the universal monarch. It is what joins heaven and earth together. This principle is singlefold: that is, it says that body and mind are able to work together harmoniously. Therefore, the mind develops a sense of openness and peacefulness, and the body develops an absence of speed and aggression. In that way, a work of art becomes gentle rather than contrived or extraordinary. It becomes a good work of art, very genuine, and it becomes worthwhile, really good, to be an artist. You can take a lot of pride in being an artist, in the positive sense. You will be so happy and feel so good to be an artist. You can work according to the principles of heaven, earth, and man, and you can expose yourself by means of those principles. It could be extraordinary, quite fabulous.”

Trungpa Rinpoche "Dharma Art"

 This retreat will explore kyudo training as the technique for realizing the nature of mind.  During this retreat we will explore the traditional  teachings of isshin and zanshin from the Japanese contemplative and martial arts and how they correlate with our training in Dzogchen and Mahamudra.  In particular we will be looking at Trungpa's pith instructions on Dharma Art and Shambhala Warriorship and applying these instructions in our Kyudo training.

Isshin means "one mind".  This is the training of shamatha meditation for Dzogchen Practitioners and, in particular, constitutes cutting through the tendency of following one thought after another.  For the Kyudo practitioner we use the  7 steps of shooting the bow to synchornize mind and body in the activity of shooting the bow.   Zanshin, "remaining mind", is the Kyudo term for vipashyana. This is resting awareness beyond the reference point of habitual mind. This expands into "Kyudo mind" which is the atmosphere of wakefulness.

 $495.00 Includes Room and Board

Event Properties

Event Date 05-25-2020
Event End Date 06-02-2020
Individual Price $495.00
$495.00 10
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